Friday, April 22, 2016

Web technology in APEX Development

How did you get started with developing your first APEX app? 

My guess is either you went to https://apex.oracle.com and got a free account or Oracle Application Express was already in your company and somebody told you the url you could connect to. For me that is really the power of APEX, you just go to an url and within minutes you created your first app.

Staying within the APEX framework?

With APEX you create web application, but you don't have to worry about CSS, JavaScript, HTML5, Session State etc. it just comes with the framework. In APEX you have Universal Theme to visually adapt the look and feel of your app, there're Dynamic Actions that do all the JavaScript for you and the framework is generating all the HTML and processing that is necessary.
So although we are creating web applications, at first we are not doing what typical web developers do (creating html, css, javascript files).
Oracle closely looks at all the web technology, makes choices which streams they will follow (e.g. JQuery framework) and implements and tests it so we don't have to worry about a thing.

Going to the next level?

The web is evolving fast, and I mean really fast (!) so maybe you saw something really nice on the web you wish you had in your APEX app, but it's not yet declaratively available... now the nice thing about APEX is that you can extend it yourself by using plugins (see the plugins section on apex.world) or just by writing the code yourself as other web developers do.


Trying new web technology locally

When you want to try those shiny new web things in your APEX app, I recommend trying to get those things working locally first. Last year for example I gave a presentation about Web Components at different Oracle conferences and this year I'll present on Service Workers. All the research I did on those topics where initially not in an APEX context. But how do you get started to try this now?

The first thing you need is a local web server. Depending the OS you're on, you might already have one (e.g. IIS, Apache, ...), if not, here's what I do on OSX.
OSX comes with Python and that allows to create a simple web server.
Open Terminal and go to the directory where you want to test your local files and run:

$ python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8000   (Python 2.7)
$ python3 -m http.server 8000   (Python 3.0)

There're many other ways to have a local web server, see for example this article or a simple web server based on node.js.

The next thing is to start developing your HTML, CSS, JavaScript etc.
To do this development, you probably want some tools; an editor like Sublime or Atom, a CSS and JS preprocessor, Browser extensions, build tools like Gulp etc.
You don't need all those tools, just an editor is fine, but soon enough you want to be more efficient in your development, and tools just help :) Here're some nice articles about different tools: Google Developers - Getting Started, Keenan Payne 13 useful web dev tools and Scott Ge list of web development tools.

Going from custom web development to APEX - use APEX Front-End Boost

So you have your local files developed and next is to integrate them in your APEX app.
You add some code to your APEX pages and upload the files so APEX can see them.
If everything works immediately - great, but most of the time you probably need to make more changes, so you change your local files, test again, upload etc. You could streamline this a bit with setting up a proxy or referencing localhost files while in development... But then you're happy your part of the APEX community...


To ease the above development and integration with APEX, Vincent Morneau and Martin Giffy D'Souza created the excellent APEX Front-End Boost package. The package is using many of the above tools behind the scenes, but it's all integrated in a nice box. This video goes in full detail what the tool is doing for you and how to use it. In short; it fills the bridge of working with a file locally, making it production ready and seeing it immediately in your APEX app :)

In the next post I'll talk about the importance of using https and also setting it up for localhost (also for APEX Front-End Boost).

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Highlight numbers in an APEX Report (SQL and Class)

Last year I blogged about highlighting negative numbers in an APEX Report, the CSS only way.
At that time I gave two alternative approaches; by using JQuery or SQL, but it looks like I didn't do those posts yet, till somebody reminded me. This post is about using SQL to highlight something in a report.

Let's say we want to highlight negative numbers in a report (as in the previous post):


We have some CSS defined inline in the Page:

.negative-number {
  color:red;
}

The negative-number class we will add to some values. All the logic to know if it's a negative number will be in SQL. Why SQL you might ask? This example is very simple, but you could call a function which has a lot of complexity to decide if you want to assign a class to a record or not, the principe of this example is more important, that you can use logic in SQL to work with CSS.

The SQL Query of the Report looks like this. Watch for the case statement where we say when to assign a value for the class:

select 
 description,
 amount,
 case 
   when amount < 0
   then 'negative-number'
   else ''
 end as class
from dimi_transaction
order by id

Finally we assign the class to the amount, by adding a span in the HTML Expression of the Amount column:


The Class column you can make Conditional = Never as it's something we just use behind the scenes.

That's how you make a bridge between SQL and CSS.

You can now play more with the case statement and even let the class or style e.g. color, come from a user defined table... unlimited possibilities :)

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Opening of APEX R&D New Zealand

We're really excited to announce that next to our Belgium office, we have opened an office in New Zealand too. This will allow us to cover multiple timezones and better serve the Australian and New Zealand market. You can read more about it on Lino's blog

 APEX R&D

Contact our team of experienced professionals for innovative, reliable and cost effective Oracle Application Express solutions. 

Regarding any custom application development, training/coaching or consulting related to Oracle APEX technology we would love to hear from you.

For more information please contact our Belgium or New Zealand office.

We look forward working with you.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Submit your abstract for KScope 16 - only 3 days left

Only 3 days left to submit your abstract for KScope 16... so don't wait longer, submit now! :)


My first ODTUG conference was in 2006 and it was awesome. On this blog you'll find different blog posts about my experience and why I love it, so I won't go over that... but from time to time I get some questions about being a presenter at the event.

"What should I submit, I don't know what to talk about?"

The topics in the Oracle Application Express track are following:
  • Integration: Relates to any work where other products are integrated with APEX or a gap is bridged between platforms. Perhaps is integration with EBS, SAP, Raspberry Pi, Node.js, OAuth, REST, etc...
  • New Release: Presentations that relate to the latest version of APEX. Typically the Oracle development team is presenting those topics.
  • Real World: Everybody loves real life examples. This is anything where a real life system is presented. The problem is explained and how APEX was used to solve it.
  • Detail Plunge: These are presentations on any topic, but the topic, even if it seems narrow, is explored in detail and with focus. It doesn't have to be complicated. I could be building plugins or Dynamic Actions.
  • Other Application Express: Everything else goes here. This is the catch-all bucket.
You can submit up to 4 abstracts.

The way I chose my topics typically fall in one of following categories:



"Why even bother, I won't be selected"

Well, without submitting you don't know. What do you have to lose? I'm sure I don't speak for myself when I say, I would love to meet new people and hear about what they do and discover. There's not a single day I don't learn anything, tech or non-tech. This weekend I learned something new and the feature has been in APEX for many years! (but that's for another blob post)
The level of presentation is very broad as well. We need presentations of all levels; beginners, intermediate and advanced.


"I don't know how to write an abstract"

On the internet there're many links how to present and write an abstract. On the ODTUG site you'll find some tips and examples.


Give it a go, you'll feel good when you've done it. Here's the link. It's all about the learning experience!

All the best and I look forward meeting you in Chicago.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Column Group Headings in an Interactive Report (APEX 5.0)

In 2008 I blogged about how to add Group Headings into an Interactive Report in Oracle Application Express (APEX 3.x!).

Here's an example what I mean with Group Headings, you want to logically group certain columns (e.g. Empno, Ename) and have a group name above them (e.g. Group 1):


The approach I used at that time worked, but it required a lot of manual work. In 2009 Martin D'Souza improved it and wrote a blog post about that. In 2010, when plugins were introduced in APEX 4, Martin wrapped it all in a nice APEX plugin which made adding Column Group Headings almost declarative. The plugin was further improved and put on GitHub.

Today, having APEX 5, and the Interactive Reports being changed a lot behind the scenes, the plugin was broken. As we're in the middle of restructuring how to share code, plugins etc., I forked Martin's git repo and made the plugin compatible with APEX 5 and Universal Theme (see version 1.0.4), so when you need it, you can grap it from the forked repo. At a later time the plugin will be moved to OraOpenSource, so depending when you read this post, check out OraOpenSource as Martin, I and many other developers will start putting our open source code on OraOpenSource.

Here's a quick how to use the plugin.

Step 1: Download the file dynamic_action_plugin_com_clarifit_apexplugin_ir_column_grouping.sql
Step 2: Import the plugin in your APEX application
Step 3: Define the Groups in the Interactive Report (you can right click on Column Groups in the  Attributes of your Interactive Report and add the Groups you need):


Step 4: Assign the group to the columns of your report (you can multi select the columns and in the right pane you can select the group):


Important: define for every column that has a group defined, a static id equal to the name of the column (e.g. ENAME).

Step 5: Add the dynamic action plugin to the page
When:
- Event: After Refresh
- Selection Type: Region
- Region:
Action:
- IR Column Grouping [Plug-In]



That's it... note that when you scroll down and you have sticky headers, the group will stay with it.


Sunday, September 27, 2015

Custom image on your APEX app login page

In a comment on my post APEX 5.0: pimping the Login page I got a question how to put your own logo or a custom image on the login page, instead of an icon.


You only need a bit of CSS to do the trick:

You can add the above CSS to your login page - Inline CSS in page attributes or you can add it to your page template or custom CSS in Universal Theme.

The result is this:


To differentiate the login page you can do a lot more, here're some things we show during our APEX UI training:

  • add transparency to the login box
  • add a background image to your entire page (blurred or not)
Again, you can do that with just some CSS.

Friday, September 25, 2015

ORDS... Yes we can!

On September 13th I got a nice surprise, an email of Steven Feuerstein with the message: "You have been selected as a finalist in the ORDS category for the 2015 Oracle Database Developer Choice Awards!"

It's always nice to get recognition for the efforts you do, so thanks so much already for the nomination. I didn't make publicity yet in order to get some up-votes, but I hope by reaching out to the people who read my blog, I gain some more up-votes :)

 

To be honest, I wondered why I deserved this nomination, especially in a category that I'm probably less "known" for.
After giving this more thought, I remembered ORDS actually started being very much linked to APEX. In the early days ORDS was even being called the "APEX Listener", and I was one of the early adopters and promoters of using the APEX Listener (now ORDS) in your APEX architecture.

In 2012 I literally travelled around the world (Belgium, the Netherlands, UK, San Francisco, San Antonio, Uruguay, Brazil, Chile) to talk about why you should move to the APEX Listener.



When looking back at that presentation, today it still stand; you still have different options for your APEX architecture, but we don't have to convince anymore about the benefits of choosing for ORDS. ORDS is now main-stream, widely adopted and proven technology. Unless it's a legacy system, I don't really see any reason anymore why you should not use ORDS in your architecture.

ORDS evolved a lot over time, and the new name reflects more what the core feature is "Oracle REST Data Services". REST web services became so important in the last years and that is exactly what I've been blogging and talking about lately (see further).

In my presentation of Microsoft Sharepoint and Oracle APEX integration (given in San Francisco, BeNeLux and Germany) I talk about the architecture and how you get your APEX data in Microsoft Sharepoint by using ORDS. But also the other way round, by using Sharepoint APIs, REST web services come into play. When you want to integrate with other systems, ORDS can really help.



I didn't blog much yet about a really interesting R&D project we've been working on in the last months - using wearables to capture sensor and patient data. At the Oracle Mobile day in the Netherlands I did a presentation which explains it in more detail. We developed native smarth phone applications that call REST web services all build in ORDS. ORDS is getting or pushing the data into our Oracle Database using JSON. Next to that we've dashboards in APEX to "see" and work with the data. We learned and still learn a lot of this project; about the volume of data, the security etc. but without ORDS it would not have been possible.



And finally a product where I'm really proud of APEX Office Print (AOP). I found it always a challenge to get documents out of APEX. I'll do some more blog posts about it in the future, but where APEX is so declarative to build your web applications, it's far from declarative to get documents out in Word, Excel, Powerpoint or PDF (at least without BI Publisher). With APEX Office Print we hope to address that. Just one APEX plugin where you define the template and which data you want to use and presto you get your document. Behind the scenes we use JSON and having ORDS makes it really easy to generate it. If you want to know more about the components behind the printing solution (and do it yourself), you'll find that in my presentation about Printing through Node.js which I presented in different countries and will present at Oracle Open World.



Furthermore, if you're interested in reading more about JSON, I've done a series of blog posts and was interviewed by Oracle about it, you find the links here.

Hopefully by doing this post you see the power of ORDS and you get some ideas yourself how to best leverage the power of this wonderful piece of software. If you liked my "ORDS-efforts" and want to give me an up-vote in the Database Developer Choice Awards, I really appreciate that.

Thanks so much,
Dimitri